Berlin Blue #20 2018

“Berlin Blue” is a lightfast inorganic pigment and is regarded as the first modern pigment that does not exist in nature. It was accidentally invented in 1706 and produced in Berlin. The recipe could be kept secret until it was published in 1724 and the colour became very popular in painting. Other names for this colour are “Prussian Blue” or, in painting, “Paris Blue”.
The photographic technique of cyanotype produces “Berlin Blue” from green ammonium ferric citrate and potassium ferricyanide under UV light. In 1843 Anna Atkins used cyanotype photograms that were contact printed to publish “Photographs of British Algae: Cyanotype Impressions”. This work is considered to be the first book illustrated with photographic images.
In medicine, “Berlin Blue” is used as a means of binding poison. The most extensive use of “Berlin Blue” in the history of nuclear accidents occurred during the Goiânia accident in Brazil in 1987 where it was used to decontaminate human beings and surfaces.

Berlin Blue #23 2018

“Berlin Blue” is a lightfast inorganic pigment and is regarded as the first modern pigment that does not exist in nature. It was accidentally invented in 1706 and produced in Berlin. The recipe could be kept secret until it was published in 1724 and the colour became very popular in painting. Other names for this colour are “Prussian Blue” or, in painting, “Paris Blue”.
The photographic technique of cyanotype produces “Berlin Blue” from green ammonium ferric citrate and potassium ferricyanide under UV light. In 1843 Anna Atkins used cyanotype photograms that were contact printed to publish “Photographs of British Algae: Cyanotype Impressions”. This work is considered to be the first book illustrated with photographic images.
In medicine, “Berlin Blue” is used as a means of binding poison. The most extensive use of “Berlin Blue” in the history of nuclear accidents occurred during the Goiânia accident in Brazil in 1987 where it was used to decontaminate human beings and surfaces.

Berlin Blue #28 2018

“Berlin Blue” is a lightfast inorganic pigment and is regarded as the first modern pigment that does not exist in nature. It was accidentally invented in 1706 and produced in Berlin. The recipe could be kept secret until it was published in 1724 and the colour became very popular in painting. Other names for this colour are “Prussian Blue” or, in painting, “Paris Blue”.
The photographic technique of cyanotype produces “Berlin Blue” from green ammonium ferric citrate and potassium ferricyanide under UV light. In 1843 Anna Atkins used cyanotype photograms that were contact printed to publish “Photographs of British Algae: Cyanotype Impressions”. This work is considered to be the first book illustrated with photographic images.
In medicine, “Berlin Blue” is used as a means of binding poison. The most extensive use of “Berlin Blue” in the history of nuclear accidents occurred during the Goiânia accident in Brazil in 1987 where it was used to decontaminate human beings and surfaces.

Note: The text above was written by the Artist. No modification was made by COCA.

Uwe Bedenbecker

Germany

https://www.discardedmagazine.com/portfolio/uwe-bedenbecker/

Uwe Bedenbecker is photographer from Germany and the author of the following two publications:

• “Dialectics of Nature” (Zine Collection No. 27, Editions Bessard, France 2015)
• “London Windows, Nature and One Tattoo” (Caravanbook, Spain 2017)

His work was shortlisted at the Dummy Award at the 7th Fotobookfestival Kassel 2015 and he was a nominee at the third ViennaPhotoBookAward in 2016.

Artist Statement: “In my photography I put a special emphasis on the examination of the relationship between humans and nature in different cultures of our world. I find my subjects mainly in large cities and on islands: both are places where civilisation and nature encounter each other in an area of limited space.”

Share this Artist