Body Farm 2019

I am interested in how we preserve our heritage and family history through storytelling, and to what extent facets of our identity are lost and found as they pass from generation to generation. Presented here, are body casts of my family members’ faces and extremities that were broken during my attempt to transport them intact from my birthplace, New York to my current home in London. This work communicates directly the fragility of memory and the difficulties we all experience retaining them in wholeness.

See full series at https://www.lorealprystaj.com/body-farm *

https://www.lorealprystaj.com/incessant-metronome

The Incessant Metronome 202

In Isolation, the hand is an anonymous character – becoming either a ‘working’ or ‘creative’ storyteller. The ‘working hand’ is a character that endures the task of building, constructing or assembling our everyday built surroundings, while the ‘creative hand’ makes, invents, and produces, decorating our everyday surroundings, often as a form of internal or emotional expression. The two are very different, but what they both have in common is the ability to bring security or comfort either objectively or subjectively.

The hand’s repetitiveness becomes familiar, predictable, and hypnotizing in the static of the unpredictable, menacing noise score, communicating directly not only the hands’ ability to bring order in an otherwise chaotic environment but also indicating its timeless presence to all matters of life– bringing rhythm and pattern to all past, present and future.

Selvedges Redefined 2020

Selvadges Redefined (2020), presents negatives, photographed while living in Lviv, Ukraine. Each image captures a segment of a building with a dark shadow cast on it from a neighboring structure–the shadows consume the building in darkness emphasizing the competitive nature of the ‘working hand’, which builds to create security. Inspired by traditional Ukrainian Embroidery, the negatives are manually cross-stitched together creating a silhouette of two neighboring Khata’s (traditional Ukrainian Cottage)–or two homes side by side. The ability of the ‘creative hand’ to either bring comfortably in the act of creating or receiving comfort by the object created is communicated in this work.

Note: The text above was written by the Artist. No modification was made by COCA.

Loreal Prystaj

United Kingdom

http://www.lorealprystaj.com

Loreal Prystaj (b. 1990, New York, USA) is a visual artist based in London, UK, recently graduating with an MA in Photography from the Royal College of Art. Her work presently focuses on the subconscious and inherited psyche. By performing as or ‘playing’ in cultural motifs – narratively or decoratively – Prystaj transforms once familiar spaces into mise en scène that highlights the connection between the physical environment and the internal states past and present. She expresses these ideas through photography, collecting, installation, and sculptural interpretation.

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